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We can work it out

Balancing your fitness regime with the right diet can often be a puzzle. Amy Mathieson asks an expert for guidance

2017-04-11

By Luke Wilson

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© ITP Images

You’ve kept up your gym regime and downloaded the fitness apps. You’re doing burpees every day and can now do at least ten press-ups without collapsing in a heap.

Don’t let all that good work go to waste by neglecting your diet. UAE-based health and wellness expert Victoria Tipper believes there’s a particular way to match your diet to your workout programmes.

“Activities that involve more endurance will need you to fuel up on more carbs,” she says. “They help replenish glycogen stores, which endurance sports put a huge dent in, causing you to tire. Strength-based exercise will require more protein to enable muscle growth and post-exercise recovery. Exercises that combine the two, such as CrossFit or boxing, need both carbs and protein.”

But it’s not just about what you eat – timing your is meal an important factor, too. Tipper recommends you should leave around two hours between your meal and workout. If you want to train before work, this isn’t feasible, but there is an alternative. “Many find that working out in a fasted state works for them,” says Tipper.
“A cup of coffee with some coconut oil in it can help to boost cortisol levels and the medium-chain fats in the coconut oil offer a great energy source.”

Later in the day, your pre-workout meal should contain carbs and proteins but be low in fat as it takes longer to digest, Tipper says. And within half an hour of your session you should consume at least 25g of protein to help rebuild damaged muscles.

So what meals does Tipper suggest? “Tuna and beans, yoghurt with half a cup of berries, omelette with black beans, sweet potato with chicken or brown rice and turkey slices are good choices.”
For more information visit www.uaecoaching.com/coaching/victoria-tipper-british.

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